Evaluating adaptive paired comparison experiments

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Paired comparison experiments are effective tools when the characteristics of the objects cannot be measured directly. In paired comparison experiments the characteristics of the objects are estimated from the result of the comparisons. The concept of paired comparison experiments was introduced by Thurstone (1927). The method by Scheffé (1952) is widely used for complete paired comparison experiments and the method by Bradley and Terry (1952) is popularly used in incomplete paired comparison experiments. In incomplete paired comparison experiments, the design of the experiment, that is, how to form the pairs to be compared, is crucial to successful analysis. Many methods including adaptive experimental designs are proposed. The tournament systems in sports and other competitions are typical examples of such designs, but their statistical properties are not fully investigated. In this paper, we discuss how tournament systems may be evaluated and propose a new criterion. We also give examples of evaluating tournaments based on the proposed criterion.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationFrontiers in Statistical Quality Control 9
PublisherPhysica-Verlag
Pages341-350
Number of pages10
ISBN (Print)9783790823790
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2010
Event9th International Workshop on Intelligent Statistical Quality Control - Beijing, China
Duration: 1 Sep 20071 Sep 2007

Publication series

NameFrontiers in Statistical Quality Control 9

Conference

Conference9th International Workshop on Intelligent Statistical Quality Control
Country/TerritoryChina
CityBeijing
Period1/09/071/09/07

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