Community Formation through the Cultural Heritage of the Japanese Colonial Period: A Case Study of Kaohsiung Butokuden (Martial Arts Hall) in Taiwan

Chiachi CHENG, Seungsoo LEE, Hsiang Pin CHIN

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

To disseminate the budo (Japanese martial arts) spirit, Japan constructed butokudens (martial arts halls) across its colonies. This study examined the Kaohsiung Butokuden (its original function as a kendo practice hall has been preserved) as an example to discuss how users take advantage of this cultural heritage. This study conducted document analysis and interviews with four government officers and six Kendo Association members. The results revealed that the Kaohsiung Butokuden has retained its original kendo practice function; it also serves as a place that transmits history and enables community construction by users for gathering Japan-related memories. Physical practice is a crucial method for strengthening social memory. The social memory of the butokuden is instilled through the participants’ practical involvement in the annual kendo practice, international competitions, guided tours, and Japanese cultural experiences. The Kaohsiung Butokuden not only constitutes a local heritage with preserved original features but also serves as an intersection of cultures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1844-1862
Number of pages19
JournalInternational Journal of the History of Sport
Volume37
Issue number17
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Keywords

  • Japanese colonial period
  • butokuden
  • cultural heritage
  • martial arts hall
  • social memory

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