3D printing of continuous carbon fiber reinforced polyphenylene sulfide: Exploring printability and importance of fiber volume fraction

M. Parker, A. Inthavong, E. Law, S. Waddell, N. Ezeokeke, R. Matsuzaki, D. Arola

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Additive manufacturing (AM) of thermoplastic polymer composites is rapidly advancing in the aerospace industry. Here, fused deposition modeling (FDM) of continuous carbon fiber reinforced polyphenylene sulfide (CCF/PPS) was explored and involved experimental filaments with nominal fiber volume fractions (Vf) ranging from 30% to 50%. The printability was evaluated using a design of experiments to quantify the contribution of process parameters to the printed filament quality, which considered microstructure, surface texture and both the thermal and mechanical properties. Results showed that nozzle height, nozzle temperature, printing speed, and flow rate were most influential parameters to the printing process; the relative importance of the printing parameters depended on the Vf. The filament with 50% Vf was successfully printed despite its high fiber volume fraction and achieved an average ultimate tensile strength of 1930 ± 150 MPa, which sets a new benchmark in strength for composites developed by AM. Nevertheless, there are challenges to achieving that strength in printed components.

Original languageEnglish
Article number102763
JournalAdditive Manufacturing
Volume54
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2022

Keywords

  • 3D printing
  • Additive manufacturing
  • Carbon fiber
  • Thermoplastic composites

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